Lead With The Left

Golfers who possess the ability to hammer 300-yard drives like clockwork often talk about the importance of firing the right side through impact. That’s all well and good, but it’s also somewhat misleading. The right side doesn’t serve as an initiator in the downswing; it’s a reactor. The right side of the body doesn’t fire as such; it responds to a proper sequence of motion initiated by the left side.

Sweet Spot: Davis Love III

Davis Love III is that rare breed of golfer who enters every tournament with a great chance to win. One of the reasons for this is his prowess with the driver. Last year, Love averaged 299 yards off the tee and notched a Total Driving ranking (accuracy plus distance) of 26, which fueled four wins and paychecks totaling $6 million. With such length off the tee, hitting greens in regulation–the most important scoring indicator–becomes a less daunting task.

Separate At The Top

There are many different ways to generate extra power in the golf swing, and here’s one of the best: create maximum extension of the arms at the top.

Swing Extremes: Foot Action

Skilled golfers know that true power results from the upper body coiling over the resistance of the lower body, and that the key to this is establishing good footwork. Typical modern-day pros are flexible enough to get the upper body behind the ball without having to lift the left foot off the ground. Instead, they shift their weight to the inside of the right foot as the left foot rolls slightly inward, allowing the left knee to rotate behind the ball. From this position, they shift weight laterally on the downswing, pushing off the ground with the right foot.

Cement and Spaghetti

My standard response to a question I frequently field at clinics and exhibitions about the proper feeling at address is: It’s like cement and spaghetti. That strange combination of metaphors raises a few eyebrows until I explain what I mean.

Positions Of Power

Learn the secrets of the longest drivers in the world

Recreational golfers, top amateurs and pros have at least one thing in common–they all want to drive it long. It’s a desire all golfers have, which is why driving ranges are full of people swinging out of their shoes in the attempt to hit it higher, longer and farther.

Don’t Get Wristy

A wrist- or hand-dominated motion can be useful in certain situations

around the green, where less-than-perfect lies mandate a conscious

manipulation of the clubhead. However, being wristy or handsy on the

tee, where the objective is to generate maximum power and distance, is

a definite no-no. With the big stick, you should strive to keep your

hands and wrists as quiet—or passive—as possible.

The Crusher

According to golf stat man L.J. Riccio, Ph.D., the most important factor for low scores is greens in regulation. Statistically, every extra green you hit in regulation is equal to two strokes off your average score. The problem is that, over the long haul, you’re not going to be in position to hit a green in regulation unless you’ve driven it long enough for a short-iron approach. That’s why this Going Low is dedicated to showing you how to stand back and let the big dog eat– in other words, to crush it off the tee.

Swing Extremes: Driver Setup

Throughout my 15 years of teaching, I’ve learned no two swings are alike. I’ve also learned that, despite the individual thumbprint every player puts on his or her swing, good swings share several common traits at key points. Unfortunately, these traits differ from the commonalities found in the swings of lesser-skilled golfers. In fact, high-handicapped golfers tend to do the exact opposite of what a fundamentally solid swing requires.

Sweet Spot: Rich Beem

Reigning PGA champ Rich Beem is a long-hitting, aggressive player with a swing more reminiscent of the players of the ’70s and ’80s, than the current, video-taught golfers of the modern era. The first thing you’ll notice about Beem is his extremely long, upright backswing, which is a bit like Tom Watson’s in his heyday. You’ll also notice that he drives his legs excessively toward the target like Jack Nicklaus. While the overall look of the swing is powerful yet a bit sloppy, Beem knows how to make it work. And his go-for-broke style not only makes him tough to beat when he’s playing well, but also makes him a lot of fun to watch.