Single-Axis Swing: An Easier Way

Fueled by the legend and memory of Moe Norman, the single-axis swing continues to intrigue with its simplicity

Moe Norman was considered by many to be the best ballstriker of all

time. Even Ben Hogan was once quoted as saying that “Moe was the only

guy that I would walk across the street to watch hit balls.” But anyone

who’s familiar with Moe Norman knows that his golf swing was a bit

unconventional. Compared to today’s popular techniques, Norman’s golf

swing adhered to a single axis, not the two planes normally associated

with the modern dynamic. Taking away and returning the club on a single

plane fueled Norman’s consistency and correctness at impact by

“de-complexing” the swing. Is a single-axis motion the best way to

swing a golf club? The debate has raged for decades. At the very least,

it effectively simplifies and helps improve the most important part of

the swing—impact. A comparison of the single-axis technique and the

modern swing shows how.

The Key Ingredient

For greater consistency and power, control that right knee

The golf swing’s a funny thing. Sometimes it’s racked with errors, yet somehow, at impact, everything is where it needs to be and the ball shoots off powerfully in the direction you intended. Other times, every shift, angle and hinge is perfect, yet a small misstep on the way to the ball results in shots that can only be described as horrific. In the first instance, Lady Luck is certainly on your side, but as we all know, she rarely hangs around for too long. And the fact that a single hiccup can bring your whole technique crashing down is, to put it bluntly, just the way golf is.