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May 2008


Instruction


  • 1 And 2

    Swing with a tempo like the pros and you'll learn to make solid contact every time


    The main difference between good iron play and poor iron play is quality of contact. Everyone that plays golf knows the difference. We all can hear the difference and we certainly can feel the difference. And while we all know that striking the ball with a descending blow is a must, most of us just can’t get it done consistently. 

  • Downswing Differences

    How to hit draws and fades by making simple adjustments to the downswing


    The hardest shot in golf is the one that flies in a straight line. It’s so difficult that even the best players in the world rarely try to hit it, mainly since this shot requires the utmost in timing and precision. Draws and fades are a lot easier to repeat, however, considering each has varying degrees from which one can produce a good result. Some fades and draws are more pronounced than others, but with the proper mechanics, any type of fade or draw can work to your benefit and can be much more repeatable than a shot that flies straight.
  • Drive It A Mile

    Add distance with long drive secrets, featuring Sean "The Beast" Fister, 5-time winner Jason Zuback and 11 more of the world's longest hitters


    One element I found all long hitters have in common is that they swing around a central axis. It’s okay to move a bit off the ball in the backswing, but if you want to transfer the maximum amount of power into the ball, you can’t sway too far back or forward. Also, you must get your right side all the way through the shot. Notice how my right shoulder and hip are shooting toward the target. This is a must!

  • Putting Problems

    The top 5 mistakes you should avoid in your putting game


    If you look at any great player, he or she has a routine for every shot. And when it comes to putting, better players know that sticking to a routine is necessary for making consistent strokes. Now, what kind of routine should you have? That’s up to you. Just try and incorporate what I’m doing here, which is looking at the putt from behind the ball, about halfway down the putting line and one more look from behind the hole. This helps to get a clear picture of the slope and speed. All that’s left here is for me to make a couple practice strokes and hit the ball. Just remember, this is my routine because it happens to work well for me.
  • Spotlight: Charles Howell III

    Find out what Charles Howell III thinks about iron play and his new Bridgestone irons


    Arguably one of the best American-born players in his 20s on the PGA Tour, Augusta native Charles Howell III had a great year in 2007. His second win came at the famed Riviera CC—a victory that kick-started his best year as far as PGA Tour earnings are concerned, having amassed more than $2.8 million on the golf course. For ’08, Howell’s game looks even better, thanks to a newfound confidence in his swing, putting and, most of all, in his new golf clubs.

Equipment


  • 2008 Ball Buyer's Guide

    Choosing the right golf ball is just as important as choosing the right set of clubs. With the right ball, you can quickly add yards, hit it higher and optimize your ballspin on and around the greens.


    In golf’s modern era, the small, round dimpled orbs that fill the pockets of your golf bags are truly the sum of their parts. From the materials that make up its cover to how it’s filled inside, a golf ball’s composition greatly affects its behavior on the course. Among other things, it determines how high or low it launches off your clubface and spins around the green and how much it compresses when hit. In short, the modern golf ball is a technological masterpiece, with a number of different varieties built specifically for players of varying skill levels. They’ve truly come a long way since a bunch of feathers were sewn inside a ratty piece of leather.

  • 2008 Driver Buyer's Guide

    The driver is unquestionably the most popular club in the bag.


    Sometimes nothing beats hitting a drive on the screws, right down the middle. For you youngsters, “hitting it on the screws” is an old, but literal saying that harkens back a whopping 20 years to when golfers used persimmon heads with screws that held the clubface together. These days, things sure have changed. Drivers don’t have screws in the front, instead you’ll sometimes find them in the back and to the sides. In other models, you’ll find carbon, titanium, tungsten and steel, all designed to serve a particular purpose, which is to help you hit the ball farther and straighter than ever. 

  • 2008 Iron Buyer's Guide

    When it comes to buying a new set of irons, be sure to pick a set that?s made for your game and swing. The right set of irons will always perform better than a set that?s not properly fitted to your needs.


    Better players know that the secret to scoring well comes from being a better iron player. Better iron shots mean shorter putts, and shorter putts lead to more pars and birdies. What irons you put in your bag are important to your golfing success, and although we say it every year, there’s more to choose from this year than there was last year! 
  • 2008 Putter Buyer's Guide

    Known as the most interesting and often the most colorful club in the bag, putters are more unique than ever. Want to try a new shape? A new material? There?s something new for everyone.


    If you’re in the mood for a new flatstick, this is a good year to find one—’08 brings forth a slew of new shapes, sizes and materials that are visually appealing, feel great and are often adjustable for your specific needs. Speaking of which, whether it’s mallet, blade, movable weights or specific inserts that you’re looking for, there’s a putter for you. The question shouldn’t be what type of putter do you want, but what kind of putter are you?
  • 2008 Shaft Buyer's Guide

    The engine of every club is the shaft, and now is the time to get your engine running at top speed. Today?s shafts are, without question, better than ever.


    One of the best ways to get your golf gear back into tip-top shape is to consider a new shaft upgrade. Sounds simple enough, right? If you’re among the many confused, heed the following. Choosing the right shaft is a matter of first determining what you need. Do you want more distance? More control? Both? The variations of shafts available are crafted to meet specific demands, and it looks like no demands are too great.

  • 2008 Wedge Buyer's Guide

    If the golf bag were to have a go to problem solver, hands down, the wedge would be the top pick. Designed to be playable from literally anywhere on the course, the right wedge can be a real lifesaver.


    Often dubbed as a “scoring tool,” the right wedge can be a real lifesaver on the golf course. Whether it’s a pitching, sand, gap or lob wedge, each can be used from a perfect lie in the fairway or a buried lie in the bunker. In fact, there’s a reason why the distance from within 100 yards is called the scoring zone. It’s the “make or break” area, where a great wedge shot can redeem a bad drive or poor approach to the green. Any miscue from this zone is considered an unforced error that should have been avoided (especially from the fairway).
  • 2008 Wood/Hybrid Buyer's Guide

    What is the freshest category in golf? We think fairway woods and hybrids have benefitted from a ton of new technology, making them more playable and more useful than ever before.


    Today, fairway woods have become longer, bigger and more powerful than ever. Hybrids, on the other hand, have become more specific, acting as either long-iron replacements or high-lofted fairway-wood replacements. The key is to begin analyzing your current set makeup in order to determine what’s missing. Need a club that goes 215 yards and stops on a dime? How about a 3-wood that flies almost as far as your driver, albeit a lot straighter? Maybe both?

  • Find Your Fit

    Everybody should get their clubs fitted, right? Two GT editors test that theory out. Read how their experience can help you.


    For a while, it seemed as though getting your clubs custom fit was reserved for Tour players and those who take their golf game extra-seriously. But now, custom fitting is made available to everyone, thanks to a new era of golf clubs that feature all kinds of equipment geared for various types of golfers. Also, clubfitting has exploded beyond simple tape measurements and basic shaft flexes.
  • May 2008

    The latest in golf equipment, instruction, training aids, apparel & more


  • Showcase: Titleist Goes High Tech


    If there’s any golf equipment manufacturer that’s normally associated with traditional designs and performance, it’s Titleist. Company engineers continue this trend with an impressive new multiple iron offering, but with a strong touch of technology. Evidence of this can be seen in the player-friendly AP1, which features a multi-material construction including the use of a tungsten nickel section, an elastomer insert and a thin stainless steel face.

Travel


  • Best Of The Southeast

    Didn't make it to the Masters? It's ok, we have the next best thing.


    Don’t worry Augusta isn’t the Southeast’s only exclusive layout. If you crave manicured fairways and first-class facilities (that are open to the public), then tee it up on one of these top-notch Southeast resorts. After all they’re just a short drive from Augusta National and a heck of a lot easier to get on. 
  • Best Of The Web

    Where to click it and book it


    Now that Web 2.0 has officially arrived and 20 percent of the world is online, it’s only natural that a large number of golfers are gravitating to their computers to do the same thing they once did over the phone or in person: book vacations, reserve tee times and buy equipment.
  • Head To The Water

    The best golf by the shore


    Say "island golf" to someone and they’ll probably picture Hawaii or some other tropical destination. But the word “island” doesn’t always equal swaying palms and surfers hanging ten a sand wedge away from the fairway. After all, golf was invented on an island where weather is anything but balmy.

  • The Gem State

    Where to play in Idaho's mountain Shangri-La


    In recent years, new golf courses have sprung up in non-traditional destinations. Consider Bandon Dunes in Oregon, which opened in 1999. It (and its sister courses, Pacific Dunes and Bandon Trails) turned an otherwise sleepy Oregon coastal town into a golfing mecca.
 
 
 
  • International residents, click here.