• Print
  • Email

April 2003

Instruction


  • Correct Calls

    Distance control starts with selecting the right club


    You’re in the middle of the fairway, 150 yards from the flagstick. “Perfect 7-iron,” you say to yourself, after which you promptly sail the ball over the pin—and over the green. What happened? Likely, you only gave yourself a fraction of the data you needed to select the right club for the shot at hand.
  • Post-Up For Precision


    Do you have a problem striking the ball solidly on a consistent basis? Do you tend to hit behind the ball? Do you struggle getting the ball to go into the air? Do you lack power? If so, it could be that you have too much lateral body movement through impact.
  • Reduce Spin, Add Distance


    Tour players are hitting the ball dramatically farther these days. Improvements in clubs and balls are contributing factors, but so is the fact that professionals have learned to reduce the amount of spin on their drives. Today’s players put in long hours finding ways to reduce backsin and create the optimal launch angle. Work on the tips below to take spin off your tee shots and hit longer, more penetrating drives.
  • The Chicken Swing


    Most teachers will instruct you to fold your left arm into your left side during your followthrough so your hands and arms can release the clubhead down the target line. That’s certainly good advice, but at times, especially in pressure-packed situations where you absolutely have to hit the ball onto the green with an iron or drive it into the center of the fairway off the tee, not folding your left arm into your side can pay huge dividends.
  • Tighten Up!

    Contrary to popular opinion, loose swings produce loose shots


    How many times have you been told to relax your grip, your arms or your entire body to better your golf shots?Everyone has, most often by a well-meaning playing partner hoping to pull you from the depths of a horrible round. However, such misguided advice can wreak havoc on your swing. Most golfers would be better served by tightening up their swings rather than making them looser or, to coin a phrase, “more fluid.” The next time a tournament airs on TV, check out Ernie Els or my old college teammate David Toms.
  • Turnstyle

    Get behind the ball for better, more powerful swings


    Most golfers know that a full, 90-degree shoulder turn is a crucial element of a solid golf swing. Without it, a proper weight shift and a correct swing plane are almost impossible to achieve. A good shoulder turn not only ensures that your shoulders and chest are behind the ball at the top of the backswing, but helps maintain consistent balance throughout your motion. Before you can master a proper shoulder turn, however, it’s important to understand what it entails and exactly what it is.

Travel


  • Travel Tip: Northern Ireland


    Like the mists that blow in off the Irish Sea, a sense of mystery tends to shroud golf in Northern Ireland. Indeed, the country itself possesses an aura of the unknown, particularly with Americans. It’s not as if the courses here are completely unknown, it’s just that they tend to be overshadowed by their more famous neighbors in Scotland, The Republic of Ireland and England. However, Northern Ireland has not only a rich golf history of its own, but also a collection of links layouts that stand up to any of its more heralded British Isles’ mates. Two, in particular, are capable of challenging for the title of best links course in the world: Royal County Down and Royal Portrush.
 
 
 
  • International residents, click here.