4=8

Four shots that will save you eight strokes



4=8
4=8
4=8
Penny on the putter: The importance of good rhythm to the full swing is well known, but it’s equally important in putting, even on short ones. To help develop a smoother, more consistent stroke, try my penny on the putter drill. To begin, simply place a penny on the flange of your putter and begin making some smooth strokes. Don’t be surprised if the penny falls off the first few times, but be sure to continue until you can keep the penny on the putter every time. Try making a bunch of three-footers in a row using this method until you feel your rhythm is good.The “Twin Towers” are simply two tees that are taped to the face of your putter. Space the tees so only the sweet spot is left open, without getting too close to the hosel. Learn to hit this spot consistently, and you’ll drop a number of strokes quickly.
Save 2 Strokes, Make The Short Ones
After just about any round of golf, I’m willing to bet most players, with the exception of Tour pros, look back and think, “If I had just made a few of those knee-knockers, I would have really scored well.” It’s true, learning to make the short ones is without question the quickest way to improve your scores. Probably the most important and overlooked aspect of short putting is making solid contact with the ball in the center of the putterface. This is the only way to create consistent speed and direction, both of which are obviously key to good putting. To improve your ballstriking, try my Twin Towers drill. Tape two tees to the face of your putter so only the sweet spot is exposed. Practice draining short putts without hitting the tees and your stroke, along with your confidence, should improve dramatically.

Tim Brown, PGA, is a “Teacher of the Year” recipient and the Head Pro at Timberlane C.C. in Gretna, La.









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